Integration Course: The Transformational Approach
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The New Christian Counselor: A Fresh Biblical and Transformational Approach

Passages Relating to “Transformation”

(Compiled by Dr. Brian Campbell, 2017)

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Please Note:  The following passages relating to the topic of transformation were retrieved using the Kindle Version of the textbook.  No page numbers are given, but the passages are sequenced from the beginning to the end of the textbook.  These are direct quotations from the textbook.  Do not utilize these direct quotations without placing them in quotation marks and providing the associated page number in your in-text citation. 

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The potential for life-changing transformation is at its peak when people are in pain.

We are partners with God in the grand and exciting adventure of seeing lives transformed.

Soul transformation for us and for our clients, involves taking responsibility for the possession of every element of the life of our souls, including the complicated process of cognition and the shaping of thought processes.

Social and political revolutions have shown no tendency to transform the heart of darkness that lies deep in the breast of every human being...

Godly change is transformational change-change that lasts and has a deeper impact-and people of faith are now demanding nothing less.

The modern church has many programs and events for evangelism but very few successful programs for discipleship-for maturing the people of the church so they truly experience the freedom of forgiveness and the power of the Spirit to transform their lives.

This book is designed to help you understand this complex interplay of truths and forces. That's why we are calling our model of counseling a biblical and transformational approach.

But the new Christian tian counselor is also committed to knowing God deeply-to the reality that transformational change is a challenging process that requires specific attention to all elements in the human personality.

Definitions of Christian counseling have changed over time.  Simply put, Christian counseling is a dynamic, collaborative process involving at least three persons-the counselor, the client, and the triune God of the Bible-aimed at transformational change for the purpose of producing higher levels of emotional, psychological, and spiritual health in persons seeking help.

The new Christian counselor believes in the God who has revealed himself and his truth in the Scriptures.  This God moves with power to transform our lives when we believe and apply the Scriptures.

More than just behavioral change, Christian counseling is concerned with transformation of the self, redemption in relationships, and freedom from bondage to sin.

Rom. 12:2: "Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God's will is-his good, pleasing and perfect will."

This same Holy Spirit is present in his transforming power to assist all Christian counselors as they help clients pursue change, and his presence provides a platform for optimism and expectancy.

Christian counselors use appropriate self-disclosure to testify to their own personal experience with the transformational ministry of the Holy Spirit and the God who opens doors of hope for overcoming  (2 Cor. 1:3-11; 12:7-10).

We believe that ours is a practical, transformational approach and that counselors engaged in this fresh biblical and transformational approach are aligning themselves with the purposes poses and direction of God's Spirit.

Christian counseling is truly about God's transformational work in people's lives.

The overarching goal isn't temporary relief--it's transformational change.  The dynamic resources of the Spirit, the word, and the family of God bring power and order in our lives and in the lives of those who seek our help.

Transformational change doesn't happen simply because a counselor and a client meet in the consulting office.  This kind of change occurs in a context that is much richer, operates so much deeper, and is much more comprehensive.

We are partners with God in the great work of helping persons to achieve healing and

A transformed heart inevitably produces a transformed life.

As our hearts are gripped by the amazing grace of God, the Spirit gradually transforms us, reveals wrong values, changes our desires and motivations, and empowers us to make choices that honor Christ.  Then, the work God is doing in us flows through us into lives of those in need.

We don't depend on sheer willpower to imitate Christ, follow him, and live for him. Transformed from the inside out, we love others because Christ loves us (1 Jn. 4:10-11), we forgive out of the deep well of our experience of God's forgiveness of our sins (Eph. 4:32), and we accept people  with warmth and humility because God has accepted us as his own (Rom. 15:7).

This path holds potential not only for renewing relationship with God but also for the total transformation of the self.

Lasting, substantive change isn't added on.  It comes from internal transformation.

As we've seen before, he draws a line to illustrate choices, and he offers the promise ise that decisions anchored in true repentance and commitment to the practice of new behaviors within a community of accountability and encouragement will lead to a transformation, moving the person in the direction of the imitation of Christ.

When secure exploration is possible.  The secure base system is the crucible in which all of this is formulated-it is the context for healthy child development and for the reparenting challenge of effective transformational psychotherapy.

These things promise life and meaning, but they cannot deliver.  The grace of Christ transforms our hearts, changes our desires and motivations, and gives us the power to begin to fulfill the Great Commandment-to love God with our whole being and to love our neighbor as ourselves.

Our own interconnectivity, rooted in the mutual submissiveness of the Trinity, is required for healthy attachment and healthy relationships.  Godly transformation happens in the center of our being, and then everything comes from it-from the inside out.

A biblical and transformational model of Christian counseling requires a comprehensive understanding of the nature of sin and its effects so that our clients learn to treasure the freedom, power, and love found in a right relation to God's amazing grace.

Letting go.  Addicts must address their craving for control.  Many of them have made professions of faith in Christ, but their hearts, minds, emotions, and wills were not transformed.

True repentance always produces joy, love, and gladness. This kind of repentance is essential for transformational change to begin and to continue for the rest of our lives.

In earlier chapters, we have seen that a transformational approach to Christian counseling occurs from the inside out.  Genuine and lasting change doesn't happen by following rules or wishing change would occur.  God melts our hearts with his love and empowers us to walk in a way that honors him and produces spiritual fruit.

Authority, as Jesus exemplified it in his relationships, provides a safe place and leads to a successful path forward.  In the transformational model of biblical counseling, our effectiveness   is rooted in Christ's authority, and we are protected by the spiritual armor we have chosen to put on piece by piece.

When our clients (or we) feel insecure and lacking in peace, we need to go back to the incredible, life-giving, heart-transforming truth of the gospel.

How do we impart this lesson to our clients?  The powerful blend of God's Word, God's Spirit, and God's people convinces minds and transforms hearts.

When the child of God memorizes Scripture, the Spirit of God provides what God needs to begin an inside-out transformation formation of the soul of the child of God, leading in the direction of the imitation of the Christ (Eph. 3; Col. 3).

At the heart of the biblical and transformational model of Christian counseling is a powerful partnership that facilitates genuine change and encourages clients to explain and explore their needs.

The grace and truth incarnated in a unique way in Christ are incarnated again in the moment of meeting between two minds and hearts for the purpose pose of healing and personal transformation.

We listen with dependence, knowing that what wisdom informs can be transformed only by the presence and power of the Holy Spirit and by a decision on the part of the client to partner with the one giving counsel and with the Spirit directing that counsel.

Transformation formation in the Core Self,   The Holy Spirit is the third person of the biblical Godhead.  His presence in the counseling encounter is of special significance because of the unique power for change and transformation of persons that is his alone to provide.

The new Christian counselor believes that when the Holy Spirit, who resides in the core of the regenerated Christian, is provided with the Word of God in the mind of the child of God, the stage is set for the commencement of a journey into personal transformation directed at the imitation of the Christ.

The ability to align with the client's preferred firing order is crucial to advancing ing the core mission of transformational change.

Only grace produces a transformed heart.  Only grace overflows in glad obedience, delight in God, and a desire to please him above all else.

Grace is the source of love and power for transformational, inside-out change.

Being conformed to the image of Christ isn't a self-improvement program, and we don't get there merely by gritting our teeth and obeying rules.  We are changed as his love floods our hearts, his greatness amazes us, and his kindness transforms our self-pity and resentment into gratitude and joy.

Our immediate goal is often pain relief, but our ultimate goal is for our clients to experience the transforming love of God so they want to follow him with all their hearts.

Professor and author Dallas Willard (2002) described the interior work God accomplishes to transform us from the inside out.  Our role as Christian counselors is to collaborate with God and our clients in this effort.

You can trust the Holy Spirit to furnish you with that power.  He is the anchor point of our belief in change as Christian counselors.  Nothing is too difficult for him, and when we and others engage his person and power in a disciplined model of training, the outcome is truly transformational.

Enablers often "fix" addicts' problems and prevent them from hitting ting bottom.  In the same way, some counselors enable their clients by giving relief too quickly and therefore short-circuit God's deeper, more lasting work to transform the person's heart, character, and life.

Human nature pushes people to attack or withdraw, to intimidate or cower.  It takes security and courage age to move toward one another with open minds, compassionate hearts, and the intention to serve.  This pursuit doesn't come naturally.  It is the product of a heart being transformed by the grace of Christ.

And the Bible doesn't stop with an accurate diagnosis of the problem.  From the opening chapters of Genesis to the closing chapters of Revelation, the writers describe the wonder of God's grace, the transforming power of his redeeming love, and the efficacy of that power and love for promoting healing in human souls and relationships.  Our task as counselors is to correctly handle the word of truth (2 Tim. 2 :15).

Christian counselors must become experts on the gospel and its implications. We can't assume our clients-even those who have been in church for many years-grasp the beauty and transforming power of the gospel of grace.

Tranquility in the core of the human soul provides fertile soil for the commencement of processes that may lead to the transformation of the total person.

One of the most important elements that the Christian counselor brings to the counseling process is our concept of how transformation takes place.

New Testament scholar N.T. Wright uses a metaphor to help us understand that we don't experience spiritual transformation by rigidly following rules or hoping change will magically happen.

N.T. Wright and Paul both advise that persons interested in soul growth must work at it.  Learning the "language of life" in the new land of the transformation requires effort.  The effort is directly tied to our view of Scripture and the Holy Spirit.

However, the Holy Spirit is not the only ingredient required for an inside-out out transformation.  Provisioned with the Word of God, the Holy Spirit works to carry out the transformation of the soul, which is the ultimate purpose of his indwelling presence and the true objective of the gospel.

Christian counselors celebrate and give attention to the gospel as the forerunner to the Spirit's indwelling, the Spirit as the sole possessor of the power to bring us from death to life, and the Scriptures as the "food" provisioning the Spirit of God to do the work of inside-out transformation that he alone can perform.

Spiritual transformation isn't easy, but it's the most important thing we'll ever do (Wright, 2010, pp. 39-42).

As God's love flows into us, it eventually overflows from us into the lives of others. This transformation may not happen soon, and it may not occur while clients are in counseling. Sooner or later, however, real healing and health are inevitably expressed in efforts to comfort others.  The overflow of God's grace is a sign of spiritual health.

The transformation from helpless, angry victims to wounded healers isn't a rare occurrence.  It's the story of most Christian counselors, and most of us will testify to the value added we discovered in our lives when we practice some of the spiritual disciplines outlined in this chapter.

Christian counselors often offer pastors a richer grasp of the effects of sin, distorted desires, and misguided motivations, as well as the process of transformation.  With these insights, Christian leaders can apply the Scriptures more effectively in their teaching and ministry.

Respect for the value of each discipline facilitates integration so that accurate assessment can be blended with genuine forgiveness, the power of spiritual transformation, and a strong foundation of hope.

Our ultimate aim is the one God has given for centuries-to know him, to love him, and to let him transform us and our clients from the inside out.

As we care for people and extend God's grace and truth to them, our goal is the same-to faithfully complete the task God has entrusted to us, namely, to proclaim the transforming love and power of God found in the gospel of Jesus Christ.  We are partnering with God to help others possess their souls and grow in Christ. In that role, we find more meaning than we ever imagined.

 

 

 

Scripture Topics

Abortion
Action
Adolescent Guidance
Adolescent Rebellion
Adultery
Alcoholism
Anger
Antichrist
Anxiety/Worry
Argumentative
Backsliding
Belief
Blessings
Blasphemy
Boastful
Born Again
Child Abuse
Children
Chosen/Elect
Christ, Death of
Christ, Divinity of
Christ, Humanity of
Christ, Identity of
Christ, Mission of
Christ, Personality of
Christ, Resurrection
Christ, Sacrifice of
Citizenship
Commandments
Communication
Communion
Complacent
Conceit
Confessing
Confusion
Darkness
Death & Dying
Denial
Depression
Devil

Disaster
Discipline
Dishonesty
Disobedience
Dissatisfaction
Divorce
Doubt
Drug Abuse
Elderly
End Times
Envy/Jealousy
Eternal Life
Evil, Resisting
Faith
Fear
Forgive
Forgiveness
Friendship
Fruitful
Gifts
Physical/Material
Gifts, Spiritual
Giving
God, All Knowing
God, All Loving
God, All Powerful
God, Awesome
God, Eternal
God, Creator
Gossip

Greedy/Stingy
Grief
Guidance
Guilt
Hardship
Hatred
Help
Homosexuality
Hopeless
Humility
Husbands
Hypocritical
Impatient
Intelligence
Joy
Judgmental
Laziness
Light
Loneliness
Lord's Prayer
Love, By God
Love , for Christ
Love, for God
Lust
Lying
Marriage
Marriage Guidance
 
Mercy
Money
Mortal Man
Obedience
Occult
Occupation/Job/Work
Parenting
Peace
Persecution
Plans
Poverty
Praising God
Prayer
Prejudice
Pride
Promiscuity
Prostitution
Protection
Psalm 23
Rebuke
Refuge/Safety
Repent
Righteous
Riches, Beware
Riches, True
Salvation
Scriptures/Word
Second Coming
Seeking God
Self-Esteem, Low
Self-Sacrifice
Sing Praises
Servant
Sex, Normal
Sex, Perverted
Sickness
Sin, Consequences
Sinful Nature
Sing Praises
Slander
Sleep Problems
Sorrow
Strength
Suffering
Swearing
Temptation
Ten Commandments
Thankful
Therapy
Thinking, Healthy
Thinking, Unhealthy
Tired
Troubles
True Riches
Trust
Truth
Unbelief
Vengeance
Weakness
Will of God
Wisdom
Witness
Wives
Worldly

Worship